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Arch Dis Child 88:222-223 doi:10.1136/adc.88.3.222
  • Community child health, public health, and epidemiology

Bacterial infections, immune overload, and MMR vaccine

  1. E Miller1,
  2. N Andrews2,
  3. P Waight1,
  4. B Taylor3
  1. 1Immunisation Division, Communicable Disease Surveillance Centre, Public Health Laboratory Service, 61 Colindale Avenue, London NW9 5EQ, UK
  2. 2Statistics Unit, Public Health Laboratory Service
  3. 3Centre for Community Child Health, Royal Free and University College Medical School, Royal Free Campus, University College London, London NW3 2PF, UK
  1. Correspondence to:
    Dr E Miller, Immunisation Division, Communicable Disease Surveillance Centre, Public Health Laboratory Service, 61 Colindale Avenue, London NW9 5EQ, UK;
    emiller{at}phls.org.uk
  • Accepted 12 September 2002

Abstract

Combined measles, mumps, and rubella (MMR) vaccine did not increase the risk of hospitalisation with invasive bacterial infection in the three months after vaccination; rather there was a protective effect. These results provide no support for the concept of “immunological overload” induced by multiple antigen vaccinations, nor calls for single antigen vaccines.

Footnotes