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Are age-appropriate antibiotic formulations missing from the WHO list of essential medicines for children? A comparison study
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    An additional age-appropriate vancomycin formulation for Clostridium Difficile Infection disease in infants and young children.

    To the editor:

    We have read with great interest the investigation by Ivanovska et al in which they compared the antibiotic formulations included on the WHO Essencial Medicines List for Children (EMLc) versus four pertinent International Formularies (-1- ). As a result, they identified nine clinically relevant additional formulations on the comparator lists which were not listed on the WHO EMLc.
    We would like to mention another relevant formulation of great interest, which was not studied by the authors as it was not included on the lists they selected for the comparison study.
    They found only one vancomycin formulation on the WHO EMLc (250mg powder for injection) and two additional formulations on the comparator lists (125mg and 250mg oral capsules). Neither the WHO EMLc nor the comparator lists had any reference about oral liquid formulations of vancomycin; they are commercially available only in a few countries. However, they are necessary to simplify and facilitate the proper oral administration of the drug to infants and young children to treat Clostridium Difficile (CD) Infection (CDI) disease in accordance with therapeutic guidelines.

    CD has become the most common cause of health care-associated infections in US hospitals (-2- ). Since the discovery of CDI there has been an alarming increase in the incidence, severity, recurrence rate of the disease and mortality. The emergence of an epidemic hypervirulent strain of toxin –producing CD in r...

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    Conflict of Interest:
    None declared.