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G443 Greater prevalence of type 2 diabetes and poorer glycaemic control among ethnic minority children in England and Wales
  1. AR Khanolkar1,2,
  2. R Amin1,
  3. D Taylor-Robinson3,
  4. R Viner1,
  5. J Warner4,
  6. T Stephenson1
  1. 1Institute of Child Health, University College London, London, UK
  2. 2Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden
  3. 3Department of Public Health and Policy, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, UK
  4. 4Department of Child Health, Children’s Hospital for Wales, Cardiff, UK

Abstract

Background Ethnic minority children are at greater risk for type 2 diabetes. The current prevalence of type 2 diabetes in children in England and Wales is not known. Additionally, very little is known on glycaemic control in paediatric type 2 diabetes globally.

Methods Using data from the National Paediatric Diabetes Audit (NPDA) for 2012–13, we estimated A. The overall, gender- and ethnic-specific prevalence of type 2 diabetes in children <16 years and B. Whether ethnicity predicts glycaemic control (mean HbA1c) in children <19 years. Ethnicity was self-identified and categorised into White, Asian, Black, Mixed, Other and ’Not-stated’. Multivariable linear regression was used to estimate differences in glycaemic control by ethnicity adjusting for socioeconomic status, age, diabetes duration and gender.

Results 307 children <16 years were identified with type 2 diabetes in 2012–13. The table shows prevalence estimates by gender and ethnicity. Overall prevalence of type 2 diabetes was 2.9/100,000 with females having a higher prevalence than males (4.3 vs. 1.5/100,000). Asians had greater than five-fold increased prevalence of type 2 diabetes compared to White children (8 vs. 1.4/100,000). The highest prevalence of type 2 diabetes was found in Asian (12.2/100,000) followed by Mixed-ethnicity (4.4/100,000) females. White males had the lowest prevalence (0.6/100,000). Mixed-ethnicity children had the highest mean HbA1c (83mmol/mol) compared to other groups; White (62 mmol/mol), Asian (65 mmol/mol), Black (63 mmol/mol), Other (66 mmol/mol) and Not-stated (61 mmol/mol). In regression analysis, Mixed-ethnicity children had the highest HbA1c levels (adjusted mean difference with the White group was 22.3 mmol/mol, 95% CI 10.9–33.6), with no significant differences observed in other ethnic groups.

Abstract G443 Table 1

Prevalence of type 2 diabetes by gender and ethnicity among children under 16 years of age in England and Wales

Conclusion Children of all ethnic-minorities have an increased prevalence of type 2 diabetes compared to White children, with Asian females being particularly affected. Results indicate a significant increase in paediatric type 2 diabetes over the past decade. Those belonging to mixed-ethnic backgrounds had the poorest glycaemic control.

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